Antique American Clock Instructions

These instructions apply to keywind pendulum clocks that are time only, or that have hour strike, or hour and half-hour strike. While written specifically for Connecticut type spring driven clocks, portions are applicable to German and French clocks as well as American style Japanese clocks. The strike synchronization instructions apply to count wheel striking, which is not self-synchronizing.
Mantle Clock Setup:

Place clock on table with back facing you. Open the back door, hang the pendulum on the hook, and close the door. Carefully place the clock where it is to be used, on a stable, level surface. Lift one side of the clock gently two inches, then put it down, to start the pendulum swinging.
Shelf Clock Setup:

Place the clock wherit is to be used, on a stable, level surface. Open the front door and hang the pendulum on the hook (on many clocks the hook is behind the dial), give the pendulum a swing, and the clock will start ticking.
Wall Clock Setup:

Choose the proper size wood screw (typically a # 8,10 or 12) to fit the hanger at the top back of the clock, and long enough to go securely through the wall into a stud. Secure the screw into the wall, angled upward at a 45 degree angle, and hang the clock. Open the front door and hang the pendulum on the hook (on many clocks the hook is behind the dial), give the pendulum a swing, and the clock will start ticking. Move the bottom of the case to the left or right until ticking is even (or if there is a beat scale beneath the pendulum, move the case so the pendulum points to zero when at rest). Secure bottom of case to wall so clock is stable.
Setting the Hands:

When settiing the clock to time move the minute hand, pausing at each hour (and half-hour for some clocks) for the clock to strike. Never move the hands counterclockwise past 6 or 12.
Winding-Eight Day Clock:

Wind the clock once per week, preferably on the same day each week. Turn the key with a smooth motion, stopping when the spring is tight (approximatley "#" turns after one week of running). Never let the key snap back in your hand, always release it gently after each half turn. Make sure clock is fully wound, so keep turning the key until the spring is obviously tight. The left square winds the strike mainspring and the right square winds the time mainspring.
Timekeeping Accuracy:

This type of clock will be able to keep time withing 4 minutes per week. You will need to do the final regulation once the clock is in its permanent location to achieve this accuracy. To check the clock's accuracy, set the hands to the correct time, and then let the clock run at least 3 or 4 days. The main factors causing variations in rate are temperature changes, and the lessening tension of the mainspring as it runs down. Once the clock is regulated to keep good time, you will need to set the hands whenever the time is off by more than a few minutes-perhaps every week or two.
Regulating the Clock-Regulating Square:

The clock can be made to go faster or slower by means of the small square on the dial. Turning it toward F speeds up the clock, and turning it toward S slows it down. Turn the square only a small amount each time. The regulating square is turned with the small end of the winding key.
Regulating the Clock-Pendulum Nut:

The clock can be made to go faster or slower by means of the nut at the bottom of the pendulum. Turning the front of the nut to the right speeds up the clock, and turning it to the left slows it down (in other words mve the nut up to speed up, or down to slow down). Turn the nut only a small amount each time.